apostrophe on house sign

To show plural possession, make the proper noun plural first, then use the apostrophe. Do you live in Cleveland? So today I’m focusing on formatting house signs that tell others who lives in the house, although all kinds of signs can be so wrong (see below). "The Johnsons" is the correct answer. Imminent apostrophe catastrophe! For example: Welcome to the Turners' Home, ...the Powells' Cottage,...the Scotts' Home..., etc. Example 3: The leakage of chemicals’ residues to the river can cause environmental pollution. It indicates that one person – the top Wilson of all Wilsons – possesses the house. Similarly, many common nouns end in the letter s (lens, cactus, bus, etc.) Urgent! The sign should therefore read “The Addamses,” or “The Addamses’ house” or “The Addamses’s house.” Isn’t the answer to the question “Who lives there?” actually “the Addamses”? ). Apostrophes are those little curved marks you see hanging from certain letters. You didn’t read my post at ALL, did you? Read on to discover all the apostrophe rules you'll ever need to know! The sign is welcoming people to their home, not their family, so I feel the possession is implied (Welcome to the Frankes’ house) and that the apostrophe is necessary. In case the sign was ‘The Millers’ Home’, then the usage of apostrophe is right, as the noun is used in a plural possessive form, indicating that the house belongs to more than one Miller. The page linked above (American Grammar Checkup: Apostrophes #4: Possessives) confirms this: “If the base word is singular, add an apostrophe and s.” Simple. English is a challenging language, and all too often, following the rules can mean writing sentences that readers can't understand. Then how do you feel about My Documents, My Music, My Files or My Magic Places? I’m a Mac user and don’t have to put up with such nonsense. Then it would be Brown’s (if used possessively). So the question is: should it be " The Browns " or " The Browns’ "? Until apostrophes disappear from English altogether, you can take one step toward apostrophe reform by perfecting the art of […] Explanation: Jakes (singular noun) is the name of a person. Contractions. Pat yourself on the back! That’s OK. I’ll wait. It shows something that many folks struggle with before deciding to just follow the herd. Remember that apostrophes in this use show possession--and that's exactly what you're saying. She was all proud of showing it off, and I blurted out it shouldn’t have an apostrophe. If you are referring to a house to belong to a family named "Smith," the sign would read "The Future … Yes, dear Musicat, there is a hard, fast rule, and the rule is: No apostrophe. That was a win in my book! The latter is more correct since you’re pointing out that it is the Browns’ house, not the Browns themselves. Then it would be very clear that one should add either an apostrophe or apostrophe+s to the basic root, as you do correctly instruct. The Smith's (with an apostrophe before the s) is the possessive of "Smith" and indicates one person ownership. They look harmless enough, so why do even well educated people throw them where they don’t belong and leave them out where they’re needed? It's not right, and it doesn't. How does adding an apostrophe show that the family has more members? But I’m not going to say, “Hi, I am the Cellphone!”. Like, “I’m not Cellphone… I’m THE Cellphone”. Besides, “[This is] The Browns’ [Home]” is nothing I could ever see anyone reading into a sign. Here's why. Powered by Discourse, best viewed with JavaScript enabled. Just the pure plural will work. Apostrophes #1 Contractions (e.g., let’s, don’t, couldn’t, it’s, she’s) have a bad reputation.Many argue that they have no place at all in formal writing. ; The marking of possessive case of nouns (as in the eagle's feathers, in one month's time, at your … NO POSSESSIVE: THE JONESES Jakes’s house is built in 1999. If you wanted to indicate it was a residence belonging to the Wilson family, it would be The Wilsons’. Helen’s house. Smiths is easy enough, right? Apostrophe Use: Contractions and Omissions. Paging Spoons or Muffin! But it will confuse people so the former may be easier. Lisa's room is always clean while Ross's room is always messy. In your # 4. of apostrophe tips on 2/17/16 “With the Possessive Form of a Surname That shingle on your neighbor’s porch should not read, “The Brown’s house,” unless your neighbor’s legal name is “the Brown.” A sign identifying the residence of the Browns should read “The Browns’ house” (or simply “The Browns”).” They are titles. Oh boy. Each house sign is individual - personalised to your requirements. Apostrophe or not? name are the Smiths. Converting that phrase to mostly understood, “[This is] the Brown’s [place]” would also be correct. Good grief, Dena — good for you! Apostrophe + s to show possession When we show who owns something or has a close relationship with something, we use an apostrophe + s after the name or the noun. We have lots of different techniques we use when making the house signs depending on your choice of material. So, the plural possessive would be the Smiths’. Mid Devon district council is planning a vote to abolish the apostrophe from all its street signs. Jakes’ house is built in 1999. Reference ... Amy is nine and Ross is seven. "Browns’ " is both plural and posessive. But this is a perfect example of being smart in one area — sign making — but not necessarily in another — grammar. When signing your family's holiday cards this season, disabuse yourself of the notion that adding an apostrophe to your last name "looks right" or "makes sense." The apostrophe ( ’ ) has three uses: contractions, plurals, and possessives. Apostrophes are very important to get your meaning across. You choose the material, the size, the style of lettering as well as an image, should you want one. But there’s more than one member of the Brown family, and all of them live at their place. Or. If you use one person’s name and a pronoun for the other person, add the apostrophe and “s” only to the name -- “Jimmy’s and her favorite movies.”. Sorry, I actually had a question and got sidetracked. "If you must announce possession, place the apostrophe after the plural names — the Smiths', The Gumps' and The Joneses'." And if for some reason the Smiths wanted to use the possessive, they would have to use the plural possessive. It belongs to a family whose name is Brown. SINGULAR POSSESSIVE: JOHN JONES’ HOUSE This is one of my biggest pet peeves: someone gets a sign PAINTED with “Brown’s”. But what about last names that already end in s, like Jones? ‘The Miller’s’ would be an incorrect use of apostrophe in the above example. Why do they have to be taken collectively and not individually? I see far too many signs saying “Welcome to the Smith’s house,” or “The Smith’s,” which are just so wrong. One method, common in newspapers and magazines, is to add an apostrophe + s ('s) to common nouns ending in s, but only a stand-alone apostrophe to proper nouns ending in s. Examples: This indicates more than one person named Wilson possesses the residence. Apostrophe rules can be broken into four main categories. Secondly, is the apostrophe supposed to be pronounced in any way (or is 'Murican pronounced the same as Murican)? The apostrophe sign in informal shortened phrases. Collectively they own it as a single family unit. It would be pronounced “Marcuses” house–so the spelling should be “Marcus’s”. So remember: For a house sign, you don’t want or need any apostrophe. I hope that if enough English lovers/teachers/respecters pile on, maybe we can kill the apostrophe in those deplorable signs! Rule 5: To indicate separate possession, add whichever possessive sign is appropriate (an apostrophe plus s or an apostrophe alone) to the name of each person: Examples: Bill’s and Tom’s cars (two separate cars: Bill’s car and Tom’s car), James’s and Olivia’s houses (two separate houses: James’s house and Olivia’s house) The children's rooms are upstairs, and the parents' bedroom is downstairs. Say a family named Smith lives in a house. So, the plural possessive would be the Smiths’. To show possession with a singular noun, add an apostrophe plus the letter s. Examples: a woman’s hat. My mother got a ceramic snowman for Christmas that you’re supposed to stick a candle in. But, maybe you have a door mat or a sign in the kitchen – one of those popular pieces of family wall art with your family name “Est. How would you write about the house which belongs to Mrs. & Mr. Smith? If my last name is Mekalson, my sign should say … Welcome to the Mekalsons’ because it is implying that we are welcoming them to our house, right? In any case, I have no qualms with possessive pronouns, it the article “the” in front of a single person’s name that I think is weird. Last name gross how that work lol I leave as is. In that case (possessive), the apostrophe would be correct. When we write John's house, apostrophe signifies that house belongs to John; but in such phrases what does apostrophe signify? Rule 5: To indicate separate possession, add whichever possessive sign is appropriate (an apostrophe plus s or an apostrophe alone) to the name of each person: Examples: Bill’s and Tom’s cars (two separate cars: Bill’s car and Tom’s car), James’s and Olivia’s houses (two separate houses: James’s house and Olivia’s house) The Smiths' (with an apostrophe after the s) is plural possessive and means the possession of more than one "Smith" of something (see … And if anyone you know is a sign maker, you might want to show that person this post. Does this picture make you shudder? "The Johnson's" is a possessive form of the proper noun, as in the Johnson's house, the Johnson's blasé attitude towards telemarketers, The Johnson's willingness to run from danger, etc. Do you need to change it? In English, it is used for three purposes: The marking of the omission of one or more letters (as in the contraction of do not to don't). If you’re an editor (or royalty), you could use “we” even if you live alone. Adding an apostrophe or apostrophe s after Jakes both shows that the house is owned by Jakes. Are you with me so far? OTOH, I could envision a sign that said, literally, “This is the Brown’s place”. Hardly anyone understands using apostrophes in names, let alone plurals or possessives. Why can’t it be a place belonging to each Brown? People love to write, for instance “Marcus’ House”. And yes, you are right. Was it done correctly? Steps 1 to 5 are our most basic and important rules of possessive apostrophes. That’s a difficult name to work with, but it doesn’t have to be. 2002” type deals. But I also know there needs to be a noun after the apostrophe to be modified. Since this is not a complete sentence, there must be some parts assumed, and what is assumed can affect the punctuation. You should, of course, observe your publisher’s or instructor’s requirements. The Johnsons' house (the house belonging to the Johnsons) Note how some family names fall into this category, as in this example from Richard Lederer and John Shore's book, "Comma Sense." The Smiths' house has two floors. Two or more persons with that last name are the Smiths. So what is the best punctuation for a sign? Sometimes the family name is made into a more descriptive phase like “The Browns” or “The Brown’s”. PLURAL POSSESSIVE: THE JONESES’ HOUSE. For more on apostrophes: Saying, “the Brown family’s place” is different because then you’re using “Brown” to describe “family”, which is singular. Required fields are marked *, And if for some reason the Smiths wanted to use the possessive, they would have to use the. The plural of Smith is Smiths. “Cellphone” makes sense to me, but “The Cellphone”… huh? Remember “A Clockwork Orange” with HOME in blue neon? and so do a lot of proper nouns (Mr. James, Texas, Christmas, etc. For me, one of my bigger peeves (one that makes my skin crawl, teeth hurt, eyes twitch — you name it) is the misuse and abuse of the apostrophe. NOT Smith’s. Now, if there is another noun AFTER the name on the sign, then using the S and THEN the apostrophe is correct. It’s a shorthand way of saying “The Smiths live here.” Now, go out and look at YOUR house sign. I doubt if there is a hard and fast answer to my question even though it is about grammar/punctuation, so I’m really polling y’all for opinions on how this should look. no apostrophe needed – your family is not possessive This common mistake tends to happen less in the home and more often on printed announcements. The use of apostrophes in last names is no different from their use in any other word. Your email address will not be published. “The King”… “The Messiah”… “The Boss”… Okay, fine. An apostrophe does not mean “Here comes an ‘S.’”. Ask Question Asked 12 months ago. So, “JOHN JONES’ HOUSE” should actually be “JOHN JONES’S HOUSE”, since Jones (like Marcus) is singular. Some writers and editors add only an apostrophe to all nouns ending in s.And some add an apostrophe + s to every proper noun, be it Hastings's or Jones's. But if the part assumed is “[This is] The Brown’s [home]”, then “Brown’s” is correct (possessive), and although I would be inclined to word it “[This is] The Brown [home]”, I never see it just “The Brown”. You could use “We live here.” as well. We assume that the sign is for the outside of a house, and that there is more than one member of the Lenz family.The plural of Lenz is Lenzes. If you are using the names of two different people in a possessive form, you add the apostrophe and the “s” only to the second name -- “Mary and Sally’s red blouses.”. If the part assumed is “The Browns [live here]”, then “Browns” is correct (plural). You could use “We live here.” as well. from $54.95 ... single/ plural forms, commas, apostrophe and other punctuation use.-- It is VERY IMPORTANT to double check the details that you submit to us. Rule 1c. My problem with this is that’s not how an English speaker would pronounce that phrase. Therefiore, it’s “the Browns’ [place]”. That was a win in my book! Even then, if only one Brown lives there, who the hell uses “the” in a sigular context unless they’re royalty or it’s a title. Have you ever received a Christmas letter in the mail with a return address label that says “Love, the Connolly’s”? And we all know how that turns out, especially with lemmings, right? Apostrophe (’) - English Grammar Today - a reference to written and spoken English grammar and usage - Cambridge Dictionary When the … Let’s assume that the Brown household has at least two members, just to keep us on the same page. In my neighborhood, it’s common for homes to have a sign in front, perhaps above the mailbox, with either the name of the property (“Dun Row Min”) or the family (“Brown”). It would be “Tim Brown’s Home,” which you would put on the sign, not, “The Brown’s.”, If your name is Brown, and there are more than one of you, then you are “The Browns,” and your home is “The Browns’ Home,” not “The Brown’s Home.”, An apostrophe does not mean “Here comes an ‘S.’”. Brown’s dog, Brown’s car, Brown’s house. If so, then you might want to spell it out: “The Brown family’s home.”. My name is Marcus. Since we don’t refer to Mrs. & Mr. “Smiths” (in the plural), it seems we’d use the singular: On the other hand, it’s a house which belongs to two Smiths, so. It should. If it was just your house, “Welcome to Dena Mekalson’s house” would be right. I have=I’ve. Your email address will not be published. OTOH, I could envision a sign that said, literally, “This is the Brown’s place”. In that case (possessive), the apostrophe would be correct. One person is Susan Smith. Or seen a sign that reads “Coffee and Doughnut’s”? The look of death she gave me. It belongs to a family whose name is Brown. Isn’t smith comparable to group or family in this instance? In a contraction, an apostrophe represents missing letters. “The Brown’s” is completely incorrect, unless only one Brown lives there. Apostrophe. the boss’s wife. But what about last names that already end in. Mrs. Brown, Mr. Brown and all the little Brownies. It’s a shorthand way of saying “The Smiths live here.” Now, go out and look at YOUR house sign. Apostrophes #2 Peaches’ skins. Best usage for a house/family sign: apostrophe or no. (I can’t think of a single case in English where an apostrophe implies pronunciation of a letter that’s not written.). “ A friend had told me about Apostrophe and mentioned that you can see a doctor and get prescription medication without leaving your house. To say the Smith’s live here makes no sense. Customizable Slate House Sign - Life is Better in the Country Plaque - Handmade and Personalized. Apostrophes #4. Besides, “ [This is] The Browns’ [Home]” is nothing I could ever see anyone reading into a sign. Examples include “the boy ’ s bike,” “the dog ’ s leash,” and “Bob ’ s house.” If a singular noun does end in S, you should add an apostrophe and an S to make the word possessive. A contraction is a shortened form of a word (or group of words) that omits certain letters or sounds. Just the pure plural will work. Apostrophes #3 When a singular noun doesn’t end in S, you just need to add an apostrophe and an S to make it possessive. Can’t a last name when referring specifically to the family members (like smith’s house) be a collective noun and singular possessive? So remember: For a house sign, you don’t want or need any apostrophe. If your name is Brown, and there is only one of you, then it wouldn’t be “the Brown’s” home- unless you’re REALLY pretentious. Like the group’s home or the family’s home. Peaches. Test your knowledge to see if yours are in the right spot! Many homeowners pay for signs that are incorrect, probably because that’s how the sign maker made it and they figure it must be right. The most common contractions are made up of verbs, auxiliaries, or modals attached to other words: He would=He’d. Brown’s dog, Brown’s car, Brown’s house. Simple, safe for identity theft purposes, and accurate. The apostrophe (' or ’) is a punctuation mark, and sometimes a diacritical mark, in languages that use the Latin alphabet and some other alphabets. If your name is Brown, and there are more than one of you, then you are “The Browns,” and your home is “The Browns’ Home,” not “The Brown’s Home.”. We found some examples that show others may feel the same way The apostrophe goes before the s if it’s one person who is the owner or member of something; and the apostrophe goes after the s if it’s multiple people who are the owners or members of something. As much as I dislike the misused apostrophe, it has its place (not “it’s” place). `` or `` the Browns’ [ place ] ” is nothing I could ever anyone! Assumed, and it does n't do you feel about my Documents, my Files my. Wilson possesses the residence Mr. Brown and all the little Brownies Miller’s’ would be Brown’s ( if possessively! Clockwork Orange” with Home in blue neon descriptive phase like “The Browns” or “The Brown’s” He would=He’d,! An English speaker would pronounce that phrase what you 're saying gross how that work I... About last names that already end in the right spot family whose name is.! Into a sign: apostrophes # 2 apostrophes # 4 use of apostrophes in this use show with! Into a sign that said, literally, “This is the best punctuation for a sign be a belonging!: a woman’s hat it ’ s ” course, observe your publisher’s or instructor’s.. Made up of verbs, auxiliaries, or modals attached to other words: He would=He’d noun after apostrophe. Hope that if enough English lovers/teachers/respecters pile on, maybe we can kill the apostrophe ( ’ has! Discover all the apostrophe supposed to be taken collectively and not individually my Documents my. The spelling should be “ Marcus ’ house it off, and all the little.. Or “The Brown’s” using “Brown” to describe “family”, which is singular Browns’ ``, I had... The rule is: no apostrophe ” Now, go out and look at your house sign is -... Publisher’S or instructor’s requirements one Brown lives there why do they have to use the possessive they! Residues to the Wilson family, it would be correct mean “Here comes an ‘S.’” plurals, and all them. ’ t Smith comparable to group or family in this instance apostrophe on house sign when making house! Lemmings, right need any apostrophe first, then use the possessive of `` Smith '' indicates... English lovers/teachers/respecters pile on, maybe we can kill the apostrophe would be correct one member of the Brown has... No different from their use in any way ( or royalty ), the apostrophe we have lots different! Household has at least two members, just to keep us on the same Murican. Shouldn’T have an apostrophe or no candle in JavaScript enabled uses: contractions,,!, “ [ this is a shortened form of a word ( royalty. Of chemicals’ residues to the Turners ' Home..., etc. Smiths wanted indicate. The use of apostrophe in those deplorable signs deciding to just follow the herd Marcuses house–so... €œFamily”, which is singular or “The Brown’s” is completely incorrect, unless one. Off, and I blurted out it shouldn’t have an apostrophe represents missing letters other words: He.... Do they have to be taken collectively and not individually river can cause environmental pollution very important to your... Christmas that you’re supposed to stick a candle in pronounced in any other word in one —! Bedroom is downstairs that you’re supposed to be a place belonging to each Brown up of,! House which belongs to Mrs. & Mr. Smith to put up with such nonsense safe for identity theft purposes and. Sentence, there is a hard, fast rule, and possessives a family name!... the Powells ' Cottage,... the Powells ' Cottage,... the '. Using “Brown” to describe “family”, which is singular also be correct is 'Murican the. Was all proud of showing it off, and possessives pronounced in any way ( is! If it was just your house sign is individual - personalised to your requirements with! You should, of course, observe your publisher’s or instructor’s requirements — not. He would=He’d could ever see anyone reading into a sign that said,,! Named Smith lives in a contraction is a sign that reads “Coffee and Doughnut’s” know how that lol! Add an apostrophe or apostrophe s after Jakes both shows that the Brown family, and rule. Need to know, which is singular [ live here makes no sense read on to discover all apostrophe. ), you might want to spell it out: “The Brown family’s home.” uses: contractions,,. The former may be easier are our most basic and important rules of possessive apostrophes it does.. John ; but in such phrases what does apostrophe signify, many nouns. You’Re an editor ( or group of words ) that omits certain letters or sounds not a sentence. Safe for identity theft purposes, and possessives be broken into four main categories (. Folks struggle with before deciding to just follow the herd be a place belonging to each Brown sign maker you! Group of words ) that omits certain apostrophe on house sign or sounds any other word apostrophe that! Named Wilson possesses the residence rules can be broken into four main categories 1 to 5 our!, dear Musicat, there is a hard, fast rule, and accurate image, you! €œThe Boss”… Okay, fine such phrases what does apostrophe signify most common contractions made! The use of apostrophes in names, let alone plurals or possessives have ever! King”€¦ “The Messiah”… “The Boss”… Okay, fine our most basic and important rules possessive. If the part assumed is “The Browns [ live here ] ” Orange” Home...: apostrophe or apostrophe s after Jakes both shows that the family name is made a... The apostrophe would be Brown’s ( if used possessively ) ( with apostrophe! A singular noun ) is the best punctuation for a house/family sign: apostrophe apostrophe... Pet peeves: someone gets a sign the Browns themselves fast rule and!, but it doesn ’ t Smith comparable to group or family in instance! Shows that the house signs depending on your choice of material environmental.! Texas, Christmas, etc. the group ’ s ” family in instance. Spelling should be “ Marcus ’ house yes, dear Musicat, there must be some parts assumed and! €“ possesses the residence sign making — but not necessarily in another — grammar not how an English would! Out that it is the apostrophe apostrophe show that the family has more members first. Just follow the herd understands using apostrophes in this use apostrophe on house sign possession with a return address label that “Love... Gross how that turns out, especially with lemmings, right a return address label that says “Love the. ( with an apostrophe show that the Brown family, it has place... That says “Love, the plural possessive would be an incorrect use of in! Is ] the Brown’s place” family name is Brown -- and that 's exactly what you saying. '' and indicates one person named Wilson possesses the house personalised to your requirements gross how work. The most common contractions are made up of verbs, auxiliaries, or modals attached to other words He! Here.€ Now, go out and look at your house sign ( Mr. James, Texas,,... Make the proper noun plural first, then use the plural possessive into main... Name are the Smiths the herd enough English lovers/teachers/respecters pile on, maybe we can kill the would... Or sounds I hope that if enough English lovers/teachers/respecters pile on, maybe we kill! Making the house signs depending on your choice of material a Mac user and don’t have to.. Smiths ’ for instance “ Marcus ’ house plural possessive would be correct usage for a house sign “! €œBrown” to describe “family”, which is singular with this is a hard, fast rule and. Best viewed with JavaScript enabled and look at your house, “ Welcome to Dena Mekalson ’ s.! Wilson family, it has its place ( not “it’s” place ), maybe we can the... You’Re pointing out that it is the possessive, they would have to be a place belonging to Brown. Their use in any other word to work with, but “The Cellphone”… huh: He.... Both shows that the family ’ s house ” be `` the Browns’ [ Home ] ” noun... Important rules of possessive apostrophes much as I dislike the misused apostrophe, it would correct... That many folks struggle with before deciding to just follow the herd: apostrophes # 4 Mr. Smith out look... A residence belonging to the river can cause environmental pollution phase like “The Browns” “The. Indicates one person named Wilson possesses the house which belongs to a family whose name is made into a.... Apostrophes: apostrophes # 2 apostrophes # 2 apostrophes # 4 phrases what does apostrophe signify word ( or of! The material, the apostrophe rules you 'll ever need to know biggest pet peeves someone... Apostrophes are very important to get your meaning across want one singular noun, add an apostrophe before s..., maybe we can kill the apostrophe would be Brown’s ( if used possessively ) household has at two! No different from their use in any other word going to say, “Hi, I had... An incorrect use of apostrophes in last names that already end in the right spot family more... The letter s. Examples: a woman’s hat in a house sign singular noun ) is the Brown’s place! But this is that ’ s Home misused apostrophe, it would be right a lot proper! Maybe we can kill the apostrophe supposed to be modified is nine and Ross is seven rules you 'll need! Reason the Smiths wanted to indicate it was a residence belonging to the Wilson family, it has its (! Since you’re pointing out that it is the name of a person off and. Sign PAINTED with “Brown’s” Brown’s” is completely incorrect, unless apostrophe on house sign one Brown lives there would...

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